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Posted by on May 21, 2015 in General | 0 comments

Video Travel Guide To Malaysia

Video Travel Guide To Malaysia

In this travel video travel guide to Malaysia, I travel to Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur, and to Terangganu, the country’s second-largest city. I start off my trip by exploring Kenyir Lake, located just west of Terangganu, which is actually the largest man-made lake in Southeast Asia (it’s the size of Singapore). I head to the far end of the lake by speedboat to go trekking into the hilly jungle where I come across a school of hungry fish waiting for eager tourists like myself to provide them with a cheap snack. I then head back on the lake to explore the many islands that call this lake home. Next, I head back onto the water — this time to the ocean — to do a little squid jigging as part of the first annual Terengganu International Squid Jigging Fest. Squid jigging, for those of you that don’t know, is the act of fishing for squid by hand with a line and hook, something I have questionable skill doing....

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Posted by on Feb 27, 2014 in General | 0 comments

More Than a Canal: Panama City

More Than a Canal: Panama City

After a decade of stop-and-go development, the Frank Gehry-designed BioMuseo opened in early February. The debut marked a defining moment for the capital in the centennial of another game changer: the Panama Canal. Actually, the museum’s protracted birth fits the subject matter of its galleries, which tell a story that began some 20 million years ago. Tectonic plates clashed and underwater volcanoes roiled to form the land bridge between continents today known as the nation of Panama, reshaping global climate and propelling massive biodiversity. Now, as Panama City transforms into a vibrant boomtown, Gehry’s riot of Play-Doh colors, convoluted shapes, and helter-skelter arrangements makes a new anchor for the evolving skyline. Sensory overload continues inside the BioMuseo. In the Panamarama gallery, wall projections of native ecosystems such as tropical cloud and rain forests envelop visitors with the point of view of sea turtles, leafcutter ants, and other indigenous creatures. Elsewhere, lopsided columns tower over gallerygoers to represent the igneous rock that thrust up from the depths of the sea to...

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Posted by on Feb 26, 2014 in General | 0 comments

I Heart My City: Caroline’s New Orleans

I Heart My City: Caroline’s New Orleans

New Orleans native Caroline Gerdes may have recently moved to Washington, D.C., but she loves her hometown. So much so that she recently spent a year–with the help of a Young Explorers grant from the National Geographic Society–of her life working on an oral history project about the Ninth Ward, where her father grew up, to document the community’s rich history and culture–especially the edible aspects. Here are some of Caroline’s favorite things about the city she’s proud to call home. Follow Caroline’s adventures on her personal blog and on Twitter @CarolineCeleste New Orleans is My City When someone comes to visit me, the first place I take them is to eat! In the morning, it’s beignets and coffee; at lunch we do po’ boys, and at dinner the red beans are on me! Spring is the best time to visit my city because you can take part in the French Quarter Fest and Jazz Fest. The po’ boy, a Louisiana classic (Photograph by Caroline Gerdes) You can see my city best from...

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Posted by on Feb 26, 2014 in General | 0 comments

Should ‘Lap Children’ Get Their Own Plane Seat?

Should ‘Lap Children’ Get Their Own Plane Seat?

Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice: Reader Question: Can kids still travel on a parent’s lap for free? Chris’s Answer: They can, but maybe a better question is, should they? Kids under two, referred to as “lap children” in airlinespeak, can fly without a ticket when they’re accompanied by a guardian. But if you’re on a full flight, you won’t be able to strap Junior into a car safety seat, which is the safest place for your baby on the plane. “Think about it,” says Eileen Ogintz, author of the Kid’s Guide series of books. “Even the coffee urns are secured on a plane. Why wouldn’t you buy your baby a seat?” So why doesn’t the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration require—instead of just recommending—child safety seats? It considered doing so in 2005 but decided not to, arguing that cash-conscious parents would choose to drive instead, which is statistically...

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Posted by on Feb 25, 2014 in General | 0 comments

Reader Recs: Best Travel Advice Ever

Reader Recs: Best Travel Advice Ever

With a new season of travel just around the corner, we asked our Facebook fans to share the best travel advice they’ve ever received. Their responses ranged from practical tips to inspirational musings. Here’s what they had to say: To kick things off, Ben C. had wise words for those of us with wanderlust: “Travel with an open mind, light heart, and as insatiable curiosity.”  Relive your trip all over again by keeping a journal while you travel. (Photograph by thesoulofhope, Flickr) Cheryl C. suggested travelers carry two debit cards, one that stays in the hotel, and one to carry with you. That way, she said, “if you mess up with one (lost, stolen, ATM eats it) you have a back up.” Along the same lines, Maria F. recommended carrying the “name of your hotel and the address” in case you get lost–and to help get around any potential language barriers. Sally W. testified to the importances of keeping a diary and taking “souvenirs of your home country to...

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Posted by on Feb 25, 2014 in General | 0 comments

China’s Green Leap Forward

China’s Green Leap Forward

A confession: I don’t play golf, partly because I’m unable to reconcile my conservation work with a sport also known for habitat destruction, massive water consumption, and heavy use of herbicides and pesticides. And yet, until the 1950s, the sport of golf as played in the pastures of Scotland existed in harmony with nature. Can the pastime reconnect with its greener roots? Some groups are trying: Europe’s Golf Environment Organization launched a sustainability program, and Audubon International has eco-certified 988 courses. Now golf may be about to take a big step, in a surprising place. “I want to introduce sustainable golf on a scale never done before,” says Ken Chu, the chairman of China’s Mission Hills—the largest golf club in the world. We are riding in a solar-powered golf cart looking at a few of the 12 courses he irrigates using only recycled gray water. On my trip, I also meet scientists monitoring air quality in a high-tech field station that Chu established. Shark-fin soup has been banned from...

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